How I Prepared To Work From Home

So, I’m a full-time freelancer now. I’m self-employed, working from home, setting my own schedule – free as a bird. It took a lot of courage and a lot of preparation to make the switch, and I’m still working at it. I’ll always be working at it. Keeping my freelance career alive is going to be constant work.

Here are just a few of the preliminary steps I took to prepare myself to work from home full-time.

I established a brand.

That’s right. Allie Racette: Freelance Writing, Editing, and Content Marketing. My business cards don’t say the right thing, but they will when I run out and have an excuse to print new ones with updated information. (In my defense, when I first designed my business cards, I had absolutely no intention of going full-time freelance.)

Anyway. I think I’ll write a full post about branding in the future, but here are a few bullet points to tide you over:

  • Develop a website.
  • Stay active on social media channels.
  • Know your audience.
  • Market yourself.
  • Publish relevant content.

I fixed up my home office.

I wanted to work from home, so I needed somewhere in my home to work – other than my couch, my favorite chair, or my bed. I’m lucky enough to have an apartment with an extra room big enough to hold my desk, my printer, my books, and the rest of my home business paraphernalia. But my desk was a mess for months and months while I was busy working my office job. So, I cleaned it up. Dedicating a space for work helped me find the motivation to sit down and focus on my writing. See the before and after of my desk clean-up here: CLICK!

I identified sources of income.

Working from home isn’t going to be easy. I don’t have a small business, I don’t have a product to sell – I’m a freelancer. And I need to make money, somehow, by writing and editing from the comfort of my apartment. I spent some time brainstorming, and came up with a few things:

  • writing and editing jobs via Upwork
  • writing articles for local publications
  • writing tutoring services for local college students

The key is to maintain multiple streams of income. If I have one client I’m doing consistent editing for, and suddenly that client doesn’t have anymore editing for me to do – well, I’m shit out of luck. If I have multiple clients, losing one won’t completely sink me. Hopefully.

I learned a lot about taxes.

When you’re self-employed, taxes S-U-C-K. I was perfectly happy filling out my 1040EZ form last filing season, because I’m single, and I have no dependents – but now, I’ve doomed myself to a future of hideously complicated taxes. Or, at least, more complicated than the taxes I’m used to.

I’ve done a lot of Googling in the past month. I’ve opened a second checking account to manage my freelancing expenses. And I’ve learned about deductions. It’s all about deductions, my freelancing friends. I’ve read many, many articles about what I can and can’t deduct as a freelancer, and I’m sure I’ll read many, many more. A few of my favorites are these nice, simple lists from Quickbooks and Freelance Taxation, and these more in-depth resources from Forbes and Freelancers Union.

I quit my day job.

A little over a year ago, after just graduating from college and starting the transition to tumultuous post-grad life, I made a blog post (on another blog) about my post-grad plan. And I very generously offered my readers this advice: don’t quit your day job.

Well. Plans change, right?

So, I quit my comfy, consistent day job to give myself more time to pursue my writing. But, my advice to you isn’t to quit your day job – and it isn’t to keep it, either. My advice is to monitor your financial needs and adjust to your situation.

Right now, I have enough money saved up to support myself for a few months while I build a client base and establish myself as a freelancer. But, if I can’t pick up enough freelance work to cover all my monthly expenses – well, I’ll go get a part-time job. Working forty hours a week provided guaranteed income, but didn’t leave me enough time to focus on my freelancing. Working twenty hours a week, though, would give me guaranteed income and the extra time I need to freelance. Like everything else in life, it’s a balancing act.

If you’re considering becoming a full-time freelancer and working from home, prepare yourself for preparation. And if you’re already working from home – what are some of the steps you took to prepare?

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